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Final Thoughts on the Presidential Campaigns in South Carolina

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A snapshot of Rebecca Meyer on the news at a Presidential rally.
A snapshot of Rebecca Meyer featured in the background of a Presidential rally.

The greatest takeaway from attending the presidential campaign events was that, as Americans, we must invest some time in the political process. It should be considered of the utmost importance to each and every one of us. Voting is a privilege. Since we won the freedom to vote, it has become a part of the fabric that makes this nation so special.

Editor’s note: This is an in-depth series of Meyer’s accounts as a military spouse and veteran hitting the Presidential Campaign Trail in South Carolina. Read from the beginning or discover her experiences with Jeb Bush, John Kasich, Marco Rubio, Donald Trump, Ben Carson, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, or skip to her final thoughts.

The interview process of our potential future president should be all of our responsibility. When these candidates come to your town or near your town, make a point to see one or two of them. Go visit with and listen to who you’d vote for, then go see one more. Then, as a favor to yourself, listen to those who oppose your views with open ears.

Be vulnerable to the possibility that what you think and believe might not exactly fit the hearts, minds and needs of others. Hearing the candidates speak inspired me to actually read up on their various stances stated on their websites.

I asked myself, what are the candidates positions and how would they support or oppose my views? How pro-life or pro-choice were they? What was their faith? What was their position on war, foreign policy, and social programs? Reading each of the candidate’s websites helped me to refocus who I’d be voting for and why.

Meyer stands and cheers for the cameras at a Rubio event.
Meyer stands and cheers for the cameras at a Rubio event.

After getting up front and personal on this adventure, I’m not sure I’d ever give myself the title of journalist. Maybe, the title of “Facebook Selfie Poster” would be more appropriate. It was an interesting journey despite having to hire extra babysitters, spend a little extra money from our gas budget and eat on a shoestring budget for a few days. The result was that I gained a new sense of self. It was a good reminder that I can be anyone I chose to be — and that my roles are not singularly defining.

I was reminded that with a few phone calls, emails, and tenacity, I can accomplish anything I put my mind to! There was inherent power in being a military spouse: it doesn’t define me, rather, it empowers me.

I’ve accomplished what I once thought was unachievable thanks to the support of Kristine Schellhaas and USMC Life: access and a voice to speak on behalf of all of us on this military journey.

Oh, and soooo who did I vote for? That’s for me to know. But, if you can read between the lines of the article above, you might just be able to piece it together. Leave me a comment if you think you know.

Lastly, I want everyone to know that simply, I was so grateful for the opportunity to have had this amazing, enlightening, intense experience. I consider it a great blessing.

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This is an in-depth series of Meyer’s accounts as a military spouse and veteran hitting the Presidential Campaign Trail in South Carolina. Read from the beginning or learn about her experiences with Jeb BushJohn Kasich, Marco Rubio, Donald Trump, Ben Carson, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, or skip to her final thoughts.

Author, military spouse, and veteran Rebecca Meyer hits the campaign trails to meet the Presidential Candidates up close and personal.

About the Author: Rebecca Meyer, a veteran of the California National Guard, married to an active duty Marine Corps pilot, works part-time for GBX delivering curriculum to separating/retiring service members on behalf of the Department of Labor, writes a veteran’s blog with ACI Benefits, and most importantly is mother to a brilliant, sweet, tree-climbing, bike riding 4-year-old.

She grew up discussing politics around the dinner table and listening to talk radio on AM several nights as a family. She stepped into politics in the 8th grade after giving an award winning (Rotary Award) speech, firmly announcing that she would be the first woman president of the United States. She has fond memories of dancing around the room with her grandparents when Bush Jr. won the election in 2000. She remains an active part of the spouse community in Beaufort, South Carolina.

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1 COMMENT

  1. You write in an unbiased nature, Ms. Meyer! So impressive as is your journey! I do appreciate your approach to seeking the best choice and being so honest about the anguish that SHOULD be a part of deciding who to vote for. Still, I know darn well who you voted for. [*insert wink here*]

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