Home News Combat Lifesaver Course Gives Marines Tools for Combat

Combat Lifesaver Course Gives Marines Tools for Combat

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By Lance Cpl. Immanuel Johnson, II Marine Expeditionary Force

Combat Lifesaver
Petty Officer 3rd Class James Hyles (left), a Combat Lifesaver instructor with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, explains to a student how to keep the victim stable during the practical application portion of the Combat Lifesaver course at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., Aug. 6, 2015. The three-day CLS course consisted of classroom instruction and practical application that included treating serious wounds that could occur in a combat situation.

MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. — Marines with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, attended a Combat Life Saver course over a span of three days at Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, Aug. 4-6, 2015.

The Marines gathered around the classroom awaiting the beginning of the CLS course that will give them the necessary training and ability to treat and save their fellow Marines’ lives when the time comes.

The three-day course consisted of classroom instruction and practical application that included treating serious wounds and injuries that could occur in a combat situation, followed by practical application exercises on the last day to demonstrate an understanding of the material.

“We culminated two days of training in the classroom setting and brought it into a scenario that helps Marines with a real life situation they can be dealing with,” said Petty Officer 3rd Class James Hyles, a CLS instructor with the company. “We had Marines do a practical application that involved some exercise to get their heart rate going and give them a feeling of what a combat scenario feels like.”

During the course, students assessed the injuries the victims received and treated them in a timely manner while receiving guidance and information by the CLS instructor.

“The course has given me the ability to help my Marines when the corpsman can’t always be there,” said Pfc. Nahari Stewart, a mortarman with the company. “The instructor helped us understand the different techniques on how to properly treat Marines needing medical attention.”

Hyles drove home the importance of CLS training for Marines.

“Sometimes you’re not going to have a corpsman next to you,” said Hyles. “Having these Marines understand the basics of combat lifesaving will save a Marine’s life one day.”

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